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we need answers !

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47 Comments

  1. I used to work for a place that made shampoos, hand lotions, etc.

    We made a liquid soap that had “Real Grapefruit Oil’ prominently displayed on the front label. We mixed 500 gallon batches at a time, and when it came time to add the grapefruit oil, we would fill a 20 ml syringe with oil and squirt it into those 500 gallons.

    Legal, but skeevey as hell.

  2. I’m just here to add that this treat is “Pillows” Chocolate flavor. They’re amazing, crunch dry cereal feel on the outside with a soft liquidy chocolate filling. I’ll have to check out the Vitamin A thing next time I grab a bag.

  3. The % on the label is not about the relative value of ingredients in the candies, it’s the recommended daily value for a normal person of said ingredients.

    So technically they could add some vitamin A, but so little that one serving would still amount for <1% of your recommended daily intake of vitamin A.

  4. “Enriched means nutrients that were lost during food processing have been added back”.
    But vitamins aren’t added in a large quantity. So even though it is present the quantity of it is quite less. And we’ll they round off the data. Otherwise there is no sense of writing something which isn’t present.

  5. They are rich with Vitamin A, I dont’ see the misunderstanding. It’s 2019 people, they just keep it in the bank. You expect them to just walk around throwing Vitamin A around all willy nilly? Get a job ya bums

  6. If this is the same product, it’s strange they’d advertise it this way, but it’s still possible.

    Whatever product it is could naturally have 1μg of vitamin A, and they enrich that to give it 4μg. If the recommended daily intake of Vitamin A is 800μg, that’s still less than 1%. Those numbers don’t contain decimals, so it would round to 0%.

  7. Enriched meaning: to make someone or something richer. I know it should mean this pack has vitamin A but it could also mean “we are selling you this because you are a sucker and we’re gonna become rich, with our own vitamin A”

  8. It just means that the amount of vitamin A per serving is so low that it registers as less than 1% of your DV. I’ve seen that on other products before where it will show you the measurement down to the microgram.

  9. It depends upon the rules for labeling. For instance, “fat-free” as an absolute term is essentially impossible, since most foods contain some amount of fats, even if it is barely detectable. So, there is a cut-off. If the amount of fat in a serving size is below that threshold, you can call it fat-free. This is why cooking sprays can use “fat-free” despite being essentially 100% fats – they have such a small serving size that the amount falls below that threshold (if you are wondering, go hit a cooking spray nozzle for the absolutely shortest time you can – that’s about 5 servings).

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    The problem is often that the FDA has to make precise rules. They can’t just say “about that much” because manufacturers would argue and hem and haw and bleat about vagueness. So the rules have to say “30g” or “4% by volume” or some-such. Of course, that also means if you play the edges, you can slip shit through. This also causes the labeling for water – if all consumables were not required to have labels because “it ought to be obvious”, every food producer in the US would start demanding to be free of labels because it ought to be obvious so why tell the consumer about the lead and arsenic?

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