rss

Native man hacks Apple, finds approach to disable iPhones

Mike Hernandez probably isn’t the first person to send a video to Apple.But his video is one the people at Apple certainly wanted to see.Hernandez called his video, “Apple, I broke your operating system.”“Basically, the file crashes any iPhone or Apple Watch as soon as you receive it,” Hernandez explained. “It’s called a denial of service attack.”Hernandez is from Boca Raton, a 20-year-old student at Florida Atlantic University.He said he was messing around on his laptop last July when he figured out a way to send what’s called a location message to any iPhone, forcing the phone to crash.“That’ll shut off anybody’s iPhone, prevent you from being able to use it, send text messages or make calls,” Hernandez said.Hernandez said he first tried it out on his friend and business partner.“He called me on his landline,” Hernandez said with a laugh. “He called me on his landline. He’s like, ‘Michael, what did you do?’”Hernandez explained to his friend how he’d just disabled his phone.He then did the same thing to another friend and to his sister, just to make sure it worked.“Immediately after that, I was like, ‘OK, what do I do with this?’ Because I have this file that potentially could be used to take out half of North America who have iPhones, and I don’t know what to do with this,” he said.Hernandez chose the high road, and sent his video alerting Apple.“Because I don’t like lawsuits, I decided to go and just send it to Apple and do the responsible disclosure,” Hernandez said. “And hope they would give me some money, which they didn’t do.”Hernandez received an email reply from Apple, telling him they were working on the problem and telling him to not discuss the issue with anybody else.Apple fixed the problem in its latest software update, giving credit to Hernandez for finding a hole in their system.Once the problem was fixed, Hernandez was free to discuss publicly what he’d found.He said he’s not sure if this will be his last hack, explaining he’s really far more into building.“I enjoy that more than breaking things,” he said, laughing. “But breaking things is fun, especially if it’s made by Apple.”WPBF 25 News called and emailed Apple.We did not receive a response.

Mike Hernandez probably isn’t the first person to send a video to Apple.

But his video is one the people at Apple certainly wanted to see.

Hernandez called his video, “Apple, I broke your operating system.”

“Basically, the file crashes any iPhone or Apple Watch as soon as you receive it,” Hernandez explained. “It’s called a denial of service attack.”

Hernandez is from Boca Raton, a 20-year-old student at Florida Atlantic University.

He said he was messing around on his laptop last July when he figured out a way to send what’s called a location message to any iPhone, forcing the phone to crash.

“That’ll shut off anybody’s iPhone, prevent you from being able to use it, send text messages or make calls,” Hernandez said.

Hernandez said he first tried it out on his friend and business partner.

“He called me on his landline,” Hernandez said with a laugh. “He called me on his landline. He’s like, ‘Michael, what did you do?’”

Hernandez explained to his friend how he’d just disabled his phone.

He then did the same thing to another friend and to his sister, just to make sure it worked.

“Immediately after that, I was like, ‘OK, what do I do with this?’ Because I have this file that potentially could be used to take out half of North America who have iPhones, and I don’t know what to do with this,” he said.

Hernandez chose the high road, and sent his video alerting Apple.

“Because I don’t like lawsuits, I decided to go and just send it to Apple and do the responsible disclosure,” Hernandez said. “And hope they would give me some money, which they didn’t do.”

Hernandez received an email reply from Apple, telling him they were working on the problem and telling him to not discuss the issue with anybody else.

Apple fixed the problem in its latest software update, giving credit to Hernandez for finding a hole in their system.

Once the problem was fixed, Hernandez was free to discuss publicly what he’d found.

He said he’s not sure if this will be his last hack, explaining he’s really far more into building.

“I enjoy that more than breaking things,” he said, laughing. “But breaking things is fun, especially if it’s made by Apple.”

WPBF 25 News called and emailed Apple.

We did not receive a response.


Source link

Tags

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Back to top button
Close