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Chambering within the regular half 2



Using a steady rest to chamber a precision rifle.

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9 Comments

  1. Thank you so much. Have been watching your videos for years, planning to chamber a .45 acp barrel for an 1893 Mauser (small ring) soon. I bought a commercial kit for that and threaded the muzzle, but the chamber is visibly tipped. So I thought I'd try my own. I've a South Bend 9" model c with a small spindle bore, (3 foot bed) So it will be between centers for me. There's a 4'5" bed and lead screw in Kissimmee I'd love to have but the guy can't ship it. It'd probably take some fitting anyway. My stuff is far from precise, but I've been able to turn out stuff better than what I could buy (for the money I could afford to spend). .

  2. vettepicking, the threads are not .003" off centre with the bore this is just run out of the bore to the support from the three point steady, with the kind of reamer holder beint used there is no need to correct this run out, adjusting a three point steady is very difficult to get aboslutly spot on, it is in fact possible to get an indicated "0" run out on the indicator rod yet the bore of the barrel could be, above, below or off to the side of the lathe centreline.

  3. Once again an excellent informative, precise, well narated and clearly explained video, well done.
    I have chambered barrels using this and the headstock method but i turn and thread the tennon whilst supported on the dead centre, the staedy being set up just touching the barrel to absorb any vibration, concentricity issues take care of themselves with the thread and bore being concentric to each other within the tolerence of the pilot of the centre cutter and the bore.

  4. If you did not have a lathe. (I have a wood lathe with a steady rest that I could chamber barrels on, but thats irreverent) could you just chuck the barrel up in a padded jaw bench vice, and use the reamer and just a normal tap handle? I don't see why not, besides taking a lot of time.

  5. I don't doubt that one bit. This is not rocket science like some make it out to be. It is a simple machining operation that can be learned by an average person with good common sense, and some mechanical ability. As long as you have the means to access the machines, and parts required, you should have no issues.

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