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The American dream of immigrants adjustments after Trump



(13 Dec 2019) RESTRICTION SUMMARY:

STORYLINE:
(Location: Santa Ana, El Salvador)
María Teresa Carballo had not heard from her daughter-in-law since the girl and her two young children left with a smuggler to the US border a week earlier.
The silence was unexpected: 17 other members of Carballo's family made the same trip between last December and May, and all made it safely after paying the smuggler $ 3,000 per person.
All surrendered to the US authorities, applied for asylum and were released in the United States to await their cases.
Things changed dramatically in May, when President Donald Trump threatened to impose crippling tariffs on all Mexican imports if the government did not stop the flow of the majority of Central American migrants crossing their territory.
Mexico responded in June by deploying thousands of members of its newly created National Guard along the country's main migration routes and in September, Mexico announced that the number of migrants arriving at the U.S. border had plummeted in more From the half.
Carballo's daughter-in-law, who is not being identified for security reasons, spent 11 days in detention in Mexico with her children before returning by bus to El Salvador.
As much of the mass migration of Central America in recent years, the driving force behind the Carballo family exodus has been fear.
Carballo lives in a neighborhood controlled by a gang, but every morning he travels to the central market of the city, which is controlled by another gang, to buy cassava, bananas and potatoes for a living with the chips he sells.
SOUNDBITE: Maria Teresa Carballo, Migrant Mother and Grandmother:
"If I take my son, they kidnap me there, there in the market, because gang members ask for documents as if they were policemen."
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El Granjero Community, El Salvador – October 10, 2019
She has reason to fear. On a stormy night in 2010, his 17-year-old grandson, Anthony, disappeared and his body was discovered two years later in a septic tank.
Until then, Carballo had been candid in his search, annoying the police when they encouraged her to let him go. After the body was found, relatives urged her to bury him in silence, out of fear. She rejected it.
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Santa Ana, El Salvador – October 10, 2019
SOUNDBITE: Maria Teresa Carballo, Migrant Mother and Grandmother:
"We were giving the face, we buried it, we watched it, when they gave us the body and for the same reason the one who is imprisoned does not know who he is, because I think he knows why he is in prison".
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San Salvador – October 13, 2019
After that, the family exodus began.
Ten months later, Carballo's daughter-in-law and her children faced a very different destiny.
On November 3, the young woman tried again and traveled from Guatemala to Ciudad Juarez across the border from El Paso, Texas, in 2½ days.
The smuggler let Carballo know that his daughter-in-law had turned himself in to the US authorities. UU.
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San Salvador – October 7, 2019
But something had changed during the summer.
SOUNDBIT: César Ríos, Director of the Salvadoran Institute of Migration:

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